GOES Product Improvement and Development

Hillger

See Future GOES

A submission to the journal Weather and Forecasting entitled “GOES Sounder Derived Product Imagery: Comparisons to Radiosondes and Use in Forecasting Severe Convection” by J. Dostalek and Tim Schmit of CIMSS at the University of Wisconsin-Madison was returned for revisions.  Corrections are currently being made and are to be returned to the editor by April 23.

Software to generate Principal Component Images (PCIs) on McIDAS systems has been copied to the CIRA FTP server so that Gary Ellrod of ORA can access it for his work on volcanic ash cases.  The same software has also been made available to the Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB).  Jim Clark requested this software so that PCIs can be generated from GOES data on non-RAMSDIS systems at SAB.  Previously PCI products were only available on the SAB RAMSDIS.

D. Hillger provided answers to several questions about GOES data posed by Octavio Fashe, a geophysics student at the University of San Marcos in Lima Peru.  Mr. Fashe contacted the RAMM Team with questions about brightness temperatures and brightness counts used to display GOES imagery after seeing our RAMMT website.  Also, a subroutine for solar zenith angle determination was delivered to Mr. Fashe.


Future GOES

A simulation was conducted of the effect of changing the 12.0 µm band (band-5) on current GOES-8 thru 11 to a 13.3 µm band (band-6) starting with GOES-M through O, the first of which is to be launched in the summer of 2001.  The simulations involved both two-band and three-band image products used for volcanic ash detection by the Satellite Analysis Branch.  The example was the 20 December 2000 eruption of Popocatepetl volcano near Mexico City simulated using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data.  The results for this case indicate that a two-band product that utilizes the 10.7 µm band-4 and new 13.3 µm band-6 is ineffective for volcanic ash detection.  However a three-band product, such as derived from Principal Component Imagery (PCI) analysis, that uses GOES bands 2, 4 and the new band-6, while still inferior to the same product with the 12.0 µm band-5, is at least of some value for volcanic ash detection.  Below are four figures that show examples of both two- and three-band products utilizing both the old and new GOES bands.
 


Figure 1
Figure 1

Figure 2
Figure 2
Figure 1: Ash plume from Popocatepetl volcano at 1715 UTC on 20 December 2000 seen in a two-band difference image simulated for GOES-8 thru 11 bands 4 and 5.

Figure 2: Same as Figure 1 but simulated for GOES-M thru O bands 4 and 6.
 


Figure 3
Figure 3

Figure 4
Figure 4
Figure 3: Ash plume from Popocatepetl volcano at 1715 UTC on 20 December 2000 seen in a three-band PCI product simulated for GOES-8 thru 11 bands 2, 4, and 5.

Figure 4: Same as Figure 3 but simulated for GOES-M thru O bands 2, 4, and 6.


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