Category Archives: POES

Questions and answers concerning Polar Orbiting Satellites.

CIRA ALPW Comparison for Two Northeast US Heavy Precipitation Events

By Sheldon Kusselson ALPW loop of 2019 event: ALPW loop of 2017 event:

Posted in Coastal Effects, Cyclogenesis, Heavy Rain and Flooding Issues, Hydrology, POES, Satellites | Leave a comment

JPSS/GOES Fire Detection Capabilities – Swan Lake Fire, AK

The Swan Lake Fire, located in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge,┬ásouth of Anchorage, AK initiated in June 2019 due to lightning. Over the past few months, the fire has steadily grown, and as of 20 August 2019, more than 130,000 … Continue reading

Posted in Fire Weather, GOES, POES, Satellites | Leave a comment

VIIRS flood observations along the Arkansas River

Heavy rain fell in Kansas, Oklahoma and Arkansas the past few weeks, causing major flooding along portions of the Arkansas River. In the RealEarth image below (i.e. 1930Z on 27 May 2019), major flooding is indicated in orange and red … Continue reading

Posted in Heavy Rain and Flooding Issues, Hydrology, POES, Satellites | Comments Off on VIIRS flood observations along the Arkansas River

Nighttime Fog Monitoring

Satellite fog monitoring during the nighttime can be a challenge since geostationary datasets are limited to infrared imagery. However, with the new GOES-16/17 and JPSS datasets users can employ polar-orbiting and geostationary imagery to identify and monitor areas of fog … Continue reading

Posted in Aviation Weather, Fog, GOES, POES, Satellites, Visibility | Comments Off on Nighttime Fog Monitoring

NCC monitoring severe weather during the nighttime

Monitoring severe weather during the nighttime can be challenging since GOES-16/17 is limited to infrared imagery during the overnight hours. In complement to geostationary data sets, polar-orbiting satellite data can be utilized, specifically the Near-Constant Contrast (NCC) product. For unfamiliar … Continue reading

Posted in GOES R, Lightning, POES, Satellites, Severe Weather | Comments Off on NCC monitoring severe weather during the nighttime