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Simulated-ABI Experimental Products from GOES-R

Please visit the GOES-R Home Page for more detailed information on the following products.

The products below are currently out of date, but this page will soon be updated with more real-time products being developed for GOES-R.

Below are experimental products that are being developed for application to the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). Some of these products use ABI-equivalent spectral bands from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) over Europe or Africa, others use spectral bands available on current GOES (either GOES-west/12 or GOES-east/11) over the U.S.. For any of the products, a click on the "Loop" or "Latest Image" words next to the product being up either a loop of several images of the product (for the last few hours), or a larger current image of the product, respectively.

Simulated GOES-R Fog/Stratus Product

Simulated GOES-R Fog/Stratus Product

The fog/straus product (above) is a 3-color product that employs spectral bands at 0.6 um, 1.6 um, and the shortwave albedo (derived from the 3.9 and 10.8 um bands), for the red, green, and blue components respectively. Snow-covered ground is red; high-level cirrus/ice clouds are orange; lower-to-middle-level stratus/water clouds are white with a blue tint; fog (on or near the ground) is white with a yellow tint, and most land surfaces are green. At night, when the visible images are dark, the product reverts to the shorwave albedo, with fog and stratus (water droplet clouds) displayed as white or lighter shades and cirrus (ice clouds) displayed as darker shades. Weather symbols are plotted on the images as available at surface observation locations.

The blowing dust product (above) is a MSG longwave split-window (10.8 minus 12.0 um) difference product that employs a special color enhancement to emphasize the negative temperature differences associated with blowing dust. Clouds are masked out of the image (in white) and positive temperature differences are not colored (in gray). Negative temperature differences from 0 K to -1 K are yellow; from -1 K to -2 K are orange; and from -2 K to -3 K are red. Yellow areas have the potential for dust, but blowing dust is generally noted by orange and red colors.

The blowing dust product (above) is a GOES-11 longwave split-window difference product that employs a special color enhancement to emphasize the negative temperature differences associated with blowing dust. Clouds are masked out of the image (in white) and positive temperature differences are not colored (in gray). Negative temperature differences from 0 K to -1 K are yellow; from -1 K to -2 K are orange; and from -2 K to -3 K are red. Yellow areas have the potential for dust, but blowing dust is generally noted by orange and red colors.

Last revised: 2007-09-07